Biocatalyzed hydrogen production in a continuous flow microbial fuel cell with a gas phase cathode

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DOIResolve DOI: http://doi.org/10.1016/j.jpowsour.2008.03.062
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TypeArticle
Journal titleJournal of Power Sources
Volume182
Issue1
Pages291297; # of pages: 7
SubjectENV; microbial fuel cell; single chamber; hydrogen; exoelectrogenic
AbstractA single liquid chamber microbial fuel cell (MFC) with a gas-collection compartment was continuously operated under electrically assisted conditions for hydrogen production. Graphite feltwas used for anode construction, while the cathodewas made of Pd/Pt coated Toray carbon fiber paper with a catalyst loading of 0.5mgcm⁻². To achieve hydrogen production, theMFCwas connected to a power supply and operated at voltages in a range of 0.5–1.3 V. Either acetate or glucosewas used as a source of carbon. At an acetate load of 1.67g(LA d)⁻¹, the volumetric rate of hydrogen production reached 0.98 LSTP (LA d)⁻¹ when a voltage of 1.16V was applied. This corresponded to a hydrogen yield of 2 mol (mol-acetate)⁻¹ with a 50% conversion efficiency. Throughout the experiment, MFC efficiency was adversely affected by the metabolic activity of methanogenic microorganisms, which competed with exoelectrogenic microorganisms for the carbon source and consumed part of the hydrogen produced at the cathode.
Publication date
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationNational Research Council Canada; NRC Biotechnology Research Institute; NRC Institute for Fuel Cell Innovation
Peer reviewedYes
NRC number49925
NPARC number12457061
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Record identifier00cefb15-5320-457c-8e54-3842b8f9aa73
Record created2009-10-26
Record modified2016-05-09
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