Photoluminescence stabilization of anodically-oxidized porous silicon layers by chemical functionalization

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DOIResolve DOI: http://doi.org/10.1063/1.1492306
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TypeArticle
Journal titleApplied Physics Letters
Volume81
Issue4
Pages601603; # of pages: 3
Subjectsilicon; elemental semiconductors; porous semiconductors; photoluminescence; oxidation; anodisation; organic compounds; surface chemistry; infrared spectra; raman spectra; passivation; anodizing; electrochemical oxidation; hydrogen bonds; infrared spectra; porosity; porous materials; porous silicon; semiconductors (materials); surface reactions; surface treatment
AbstractElectrochemical oxidation of porous silicon (PSi) produces a surface that is covered with native silicon–hydrogen (Si–Hx) bonds and regions with oxidized Si–Si back-bonds (OSi–Hx). Such anodically oxidized PSi layers were chemically modified using 1-decene under thermal conditions. The hydrosilylation reaction consumes mainly the nonoxidized Si–Hx bonds and yields a surface with oxidized and alkylated regions that were characterized using transmission IR and Raman spectroscopies. The brightest photoluminescence (PL) was obtained when the PSi sample was anodized in 1 M sulfuric acid (H₂SO₄) at 3 mA/cm² for 5 min. The chemical process preserves the PL and the physical properties of the porous layer. The derivatized PSi surfaces are stable in boiling CCl4 and in water.
Publication date
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationNRC Institute for Microstructural Sciences; National Research Council Canada; NRC Steacie Institute for Molecular Sciences
Peer reviewedYes
NPARC number12744334
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Record identifier01e98361-db0a-4c0e-8b64-d4f727a8850b
Record created2009-10-27
Record modified2016-05-09
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