Isolation of sterols from the marine fungus Corollospora lacera

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DOIResolve DOI: http://doi.org/10.1139/W04-103
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TypeArticle
Journal titleCanadian Journal of Microbiology
Volume50
Issue12
Pages10691072; # of pages: 4
Subjectmarine fungus; sterols; metabolites
AbstractSeveral marine fungi collected from the waters of Prince Edward Island, Canada, were screened for the presence of natural products exhibiting antibacterial activity. Both broths and mycelia of these fungi were studied using the bioassay-guided chromatographic separation. The 4 fractions from the extract of mycelia of Corollospora lacera exhibited weak antibacterial activity and were analyzed further. From these fractions, 2 sterols (5a,8a-epidioxyergosterol and 22E,24R-ergosta-7,22-diene-3ÃͶ,5a,6ÃͶ-triol) and a 3:1 mixture of linoleic and oleic acids were isolated. The presence of ergosterol was confirmed in dichloromethane extracts of mycelia of every fungus in this study and this sterol was isolated from the extract of mycelium of Corollospora lacera. Two other known compounds (5-hydroxymethylfuran-2-carbaldehyde and bis(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate), were isolated from the dichloromethane extract of mycelium of Monodictys pelagica. The phthalate was reported in the literature as a metabolite isolated from the fungi, but in our study it was proven to be an artifact of the culturing and (or) extraction procedures rather than a true fungal metabolite.
Publication date
PublisherNRC Research Press
Copyright notice© 2004 NRC Canada
LanguageFrench
AffiliationNRC Institute for Marine Biosciences; National Research Council Canada
Peer reviewedYes
NRC number1691
NPARC number3538426
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Record identifier043c646e-5c07-40a4-b42b-0e520afa37f8
Record created2009-03-01
Record modified2016-05-09
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