Effect of the oxygen content in solution on the static and cyclic deformation of titanium foams

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DOIResolve DOI: http://doi.org/10.1007/s10856-009-3798-x
AuthorSearch for: ; Search for: ; Search for:
TypeArticle
Journal titleJournal of Materials Science: Materials in Medicine
Volume20
Issue11
Pages22232233; # of pages: 11
Subjectoxygen content; titanium foams; mechanical property
AbstractIt is well known that interstitials affect the mechanical properties of titanium and titanium alloys. Their effects on the fatigue properties of titanium foams have not, however, been documented in the literature. This paper presents the effect of the oxygen content on the static and dynamic compression properties of titanium foams. Increasing the oxygen content from 0.24 to 0.51 wt% O in solution significantly increases the yield strength and reduces the ductility of the foams. However, the fatigue limit is not significantly affected by the oxygen content and falls within the 92 MPa ± 12 MPa range for all specimens investigated in this study. During cyclic loading, deformation is initially coming from cumulative creep followed by the formation of microcracks. The coalescence of these microcracks is responsible for the rupture of the specimens. Fracture surfaces of the specimens having lower oxygen content show a more ductile aspect than the specimens having higher oxygen content.
Publication date
PublisherSpinger
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationNRC Industrial Materials Institute (IMI-IMI); National Research Council Canada
Access conditionavailable
unlimited
public
Peer reviewedYes
NRC number52358
NPARC number10820125
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Record identifier05a18aa7-60bd-463a-9076-b2ad964ec385
Record created2009-10-02
Record modified2016-05-09
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