Mechanism of surface microcracking of matrix in glass- reinforced polyester by artificial weathering

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TypeArticle
Journal titleJournal of Materials Science
ISSN0022-2461
Volume8
IssueSept. 9
Pages13311339; # of pages: 9
Subjectpolyester; glass fibres; crackings (breaking); weathering
AbstractThe first stage in the deterioration of glass-fibre reinforced polyester (GRP) composites, fibre prominence, has been reported. The mechanism of the second stage, surface microcracking, is now described. Under controlled conditions GRP sheets were subjected to cyclic variation of moisture and temperature and to radiation. It is proposed that surface microcracking takes place under the combined action of radiation-induced tensile stresses in the surface region and physically-induced stress-fatigue. Tensile stresses in the surface region are caused by shrinkage of the matrix that results from cross-linking induced by the ultra-violet portion of radiation. Stress fatigue is imposed on the composite system by physically-induced alternating stresses produced by cyclic variation of temperature and, probably, moisture resulting from thermal and moisture gradients and inhomogeneities. Stress-fatigue probably plays a dominant role in microcracking induced by artifical weathering, whereas radiation-induced stresses in the surface region are more important in microcracking occuring in outdoor weathering.
Publication date
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationNRC Institute for Research in Construction; National Research Council Canada
Peer reviewedNo
IdentifierDBR-RP-587
NRC number13750
2713
NPARC number20374497
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Record identifier06653d8a-140a-41e8-bcf7-64ce53875c59
Record created2012-07-23
Record modified2016-05-09
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