Far-Ultraviolet Observations of the Galactic Supersoft Binary RX J0019.8+2156 (QR Andromedae)

Download
  1. (PDF, 588 KB)
  2. Get@NRC: Far-Ultraviolet Observations of the Galactic Supersoft Binary RX J0019.8+2156 (QR Andromedae) (Opens in a new window)
DOIResolve DOI: http://doi.org/10.1086/322114
AuthorSearch for: ; Search for: ; Search for: ; Search for: ; Search for:
TypeArticle
Journal titleThe Astronomical Journal
ISSN0004-6256
Volume122
Issue3
Pages15721577; # of pages: 6
Subjectbinaries: close; ISM: jets and outflows; stars: individual (RX J0019.8+2156=QR And); ultraviolet emission; X-rays
AbstractFar-Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer spectra were obtained of the supersoft X-ray binary RX J0019.8+2156 (QR And) during 16 consecutive spacecraft orbits, covering the binary orbit (P = 15.85 hr) with about 0.2 phase overlap. The spectrum is dominated by strong H2 absorption (column density ~1020 g cm-2), which appears at the velocity different from other interstellar absorption lines and may be partially circumbinary. This absorption makes study of spectral features from the binary system difficult. The only well-detected emission lines are He II λ1085 and O VI λ1032 (the other line of the O VI doublet, at 1037 Å, is largely obscured by strong H2 absorption). The O VI shows a P Cygni profile that varies in velocity and strength with binary phase. We compare this with similar changes seen in Balmer line profiles. We extract the far-ultraviolet (FUV) light curve and compare it with the optical light curve. There is an eclipse in both wavelength regions, but the FUV minimum lasts much longer, well beyond the visible light egress. The FUV results are discussed in connection with the binary model and mass flows within the system.
Publication date
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationNRC Herzberg Institute of Astrophysics; National Research Council Canada
Peer reviewedYes
NPARC number21275274
Export citationExport as RIS
Report a correctionReport a correction
Record identifier06dd086f-351d-4c62-94e5-fd8e1e4187a3
Record created2015-05-28
Record modified2016-05-09
Bookmark and share
  • Share this page with Facebook (Opens in a new window)
  • Share this page with Twitter (Opens in a new window)
  • Share this page with Google+ (Opens in a new window)
  • Share this page with Delicious (Opens in a new window)