A conventional synthesis approach to prepare lead sulfide (PbS) nanoparticles via solvothermal method

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TypeArticle
Journal titleChalcogenide Letters
Volume11
Issue10
Pages531539; # of pages: 9
SubjectNanostructures; Chemical synthesis; Electron microscopy; X-ray diffraction; Optical properties
AbstractWe are describing a new optimized method for the preparation of single-sized crystalline lead sulphide (PbS) nanoparticles (NPs). The optimized solvothermal method uses a mixture of octadecene and oleic acid as a reaction media and MBTS as a reducing agent. Systematic investigation was performed on various synthesis parameters, such as acid to lead (Pb) and lead to sulphur(S) feed molar ratios, feed amounts of various phosphine compounds, reducing agent, total concentrations of reaction media, growth temperature, as well as different sulphur source compounds. We optimized the amount of 2,2-dithiobis(benzothiazole) (MBTS) in the reaction mixture to produce about 100 nm size and spherical shape zinc blade type PbS NPs. A broad UV absorption spectrum was observed when the MBTS amount was increased in the reaction mixture. The excellent organic solvent dispersion properties, along with near-IR emission spectrum window make these NPs a great choice in optoelectronics applications, especially for photovoltaic devices.
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LanguageEnglish
Peer reviewedYes
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This is a non-NRC publication

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NPARC number21276086
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Record identifier07a2641e-9714-473e-b3bf-27b4d1aefd79
Record created2015-09-22
Record modified2016-05-09
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