Thermoreversible hydrogels based on triblock copolymers of poly(ethylene glycol) and carboxyl functionalized poly(ε-caprolactone): the effect of carboxyl group substitution on the transition temperature and biocompatibility in plasma

Download
  1. Get@NRC: Thermoreversible hydrogels based on triblock copolymers of poly(ethylene glycol) and carboxyl functionalized poly(ε-caprolactone): the effect of carboxyl group substitution on the transition temperature and biocompatibility in plasma (Opens in a new window)
DOIResolve DOI: http://doi.org/10.1016/j.actbio.2014.10.001
AuthorSearch for: ; Search for: ; Search for: ; Search for: ; Search for: ; Search for: ; Search for:
TypeArticle
Journal titleActa Biomaterialia
ISSN1742-7061
Volume12
Pages8192
Subjectin situ hydrogel; thermoresponsive; protein adsorption; biodegradable gel; biocompatibility
AbstractIn this study we report on the development, characterization and plasma protein interaction of novel thermoresponsive in situ hydrogels based on triblock copolymers of poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) and poly(α-carboxyl-co-benzyl carboxylate)-ε-caprolactone (PCBCL) having two different degrees of carboxyl group substitution on the PCBCL block. Block copolymers were synthesized through ring-opening polymerization of α-benzyl carboxylate-ε-caprolactone by dihydroxy PEG, leading to the production of poly(α-benzyl carboxylate-ε-caprolactone)–PEG–poly(α-benzyl carboxylate-ε-caprolactone) (PBCL–PEG–PBCL). This was followed by partial debenzylation of PBCL blocks under controlled conditions, leading to the preparation of PCBCL–PEG–PCBCL triblock copolymers with 30 and 54 mol.% carboxyl group substitution. Prepared PCBCL–PEG–PCBCL block copolymers have been shown to have a concentration-dependent sol to gel transition as a result of an increase in temperature above ∼29 °C, as evidenced by the inverse flow method, differential scanning calorimetry and dynamic mechanical analysis. The sol–gel transition temperature/concentration and dynamic mechanical properties of the gel were found to be dependent on the level of carboxyl group substitution. Both hydrogels (30 and 54 mol.% carboxyl group substitution) showed similar amounts of protein adsorption but striking differences in the profiles of the adsorbed proteome. Additionally, the two systems showed similarities in their clot formation kinetics but substantial differences in clot endpoints. The results show great promise for the above-mentioned thermoreversible in situ hydrogels as biocompatible materials for biomedical applications.
Publication date
PublisherElsevier
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationNational Institute for Nanotechnology; National Research Council Canada
Peer reviewedYes
NPARC number23001697
Export citationExport as RIS
Report a correctionReport a correction
Record identifier08952627-1c6c-4884-977e-5413bbbeab91
Record created2017-03-20
Record modified2017-03-20
Bookmark and share
  • Share this page with Facebook (Opens in a new window)
  • Share this page with Twitter (Opens in a new window)
  • Share this page with Google+ (Opens in a new window)
  • Share this page with Delicious (Opens in a new window)