Acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) increases the solubility of cholesterol when incorporated in lipid membranes

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DOIResolve DOI: http://doi.org/10.1039/c4sm00372a
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TypeArticle
Journal titleSoft Matter
ISSN1744-6848
Volume10
Issue24
Pages42754286; # of pages: 12
SubjectCell membranes; Cytology; Fluidity; Lipid bilayers; X ray diffraction; Acetylsalicylic acids; Condensation effects; Dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine; Experimental evidence; High cholesterols; High resolution X ray diffraction; Lipid membranes; Membrane fluidity; Cholesterol
AbstractCholesterol has been well established as a mediator of cell membrane fluidity. By interacting with lipid tails, cholesterol causes the membrane tails to be constrained thereby reducing membrane fluidity, well known as the condensation effect. Acetylsalicylic acid (ASA), the main ingredient in aspirin, has recently been shown to increase fluidity in lipid bilayers by primarily interacting with lipid head groups. We used high-resolution X-ray diffraction to study both ASA and cholesterol coexisting in model membranes of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC). While a high cholesterol concentration of 40 mol% cholesterol leads to the formation of immiscible cholesterol bilayers, as was reported previously, increasing the amount of ASA in the membranes between 0 to 12.5 mol% was found to significantly increase the fluidity of the bilayers and dissolve the cholesterol plaques. We, therefore, present experimental evidence for an interaction between cholesterol and ASA on the level of the cell membrane at elevated levels of cholesterol and ASA. © 2014 the Partner Organisations.
Publication date
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationNational Research Council Canada (NRC-CNRC); NRC Canadian Neutron Beam Centre (CNBC-CCFN)
Peer reviewedYes
NPARC number21272245
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Record identifier090e044c-f85d-45fe-8146-a9107f38ef8e
Record created2014-07-23
Record modified2016-05-09
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