The utility of near infrared imaging in intra-operative prediction of flap outcome: A reverse McFarlane skin flap model study

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DOIResolve DOI: http://doi.org/10.1255/1007
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TypeArticle
Journal titleJournal of Near Infrared Spectroscopy
ISSN0967-0335
Volume20
Issue5
Pages601615; # of pages: 15
AbstractSkin flaps are complex procedures used extensively in reconstructive surgery that require post-operative monitoring to ensure that they do not fail. Near infrared (NIR) spectroscopic imaging is a convenient, non-invasive method for surgeons to examine flaps during surgery and in the early post-operative period. Using a reverse McFarlane skin flap model, we show that model-free chemometric methods as well as simple modified Beer-Lambert analysis of the NIR images provide insights into the blood supply to flaps and demonstrate that the technique can detect and localise perfusion-related complications as well as give real-time feedback to the surgeon as they try to resolve the complication. We also show that using estimates of tissue haemoglobin oxygen saturation, imaging measurements made during surgery and in the early post-operative period are highly predictive of the outcome of the flap tissue with specificities and sensitivities exceeding 85%. © IM Publications LLP 2012. All rights reserved.
Publication date
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationNational Research Council Canada (NRC-CNRC); NRC Institute for Biodiagnostics (IBD-IBD)
Peer reviewedYes
NPARC number21269291
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Record identifier0b14fc78-a1d7-456b-8232-4f30c9eaac63
Record created2013-12-12
Record modified2016-05-09
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