Vibrational biospectroscopy : from plants to animals to humans. A historical perspective

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DOIResolve DOI: http://doi.org/10.1016/S0022-2860(98)00648-6
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TypeArticle
Journal titleJournal of Molecular Structure
Volume480/481
Pages113; # of pages: 13
SubjectPathology; Clinical chemistry; Imaging; Multivatiate analysis; Chemometrics
AbstractToday, more than ever, vibrational spectroscopy means different things to different people. From their roots as molecular fingerprinting techniques, both infrared and Raman spectroscopy have evolved to the point where they play roles in a staggering variety of scientific endeavors. This survey focuses upon biological and medical applications. The past 40 years have witnessed enormous advances in our understanding of the building blocks of life, and vibrational spectroscopy has played an important role. That role is reviewed briefly here. In parallel with these efforts, the near-IR community developed powerful ‘chemometric’ methods to extract a wealth of information from spectra that appeared superficially featureless. As vibrational spectroscopy is finding new niches in the medical and clinical realms, these chemometric methods are proving to be a valuable (but not infallible!) adjunct to conventional spectral interpretation. This survey includes a brief outline of biomedical vibrational spectroscopy and imaging, including several representative examples to illustrate the strengths and pitfalls of a growing reliance upon multivariate quantitation and classification methods.
Publication date
PublisherElsevier Science B.V.
AffiliationNational Research Council Canada; NRC Institute for Biodiagnostics
Peer reviewedYes
NRC number925
NPARC number9724541
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Record identifier0b6c1f3b-abb2-4f06-badb-247c250de14c
Record created2009-07-17
Record modified2016-10-13
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