Electrolyte effect on gelation behavior of oppositely charged nanocrystalline cellulose and polyelectrolyte

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DOIResolve DOI: http://doi.org/10.1016/j.carbpol.2014.07.040
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TypeArticle
Journal titleCarbohydrate Polymers
ISSN0144-8617
Volume114
Pages5764; # of pages: 8
SubjectNanocrystalline cellulose; Gelation; Opposite charge; Electrolytes
AbstractThe electrolyte (NaCl) influences on the sol-gel transition of the complex solution composed of oppositely charged nanocrystalline cellulose (NCC) and polyelectrolyte (quaternized hydroxyethylcellulose ethoxylate, QHEC) were investigated by the rheological means in the present paper. Winter and Chambon theory was applicable to describe the sol-gel transition, and the critical gel points have been successfully determined. When increasing the NaCl concentration, more NCC were needed to form a critical gel due to the screening of the electrostatic interaction, and the larger loss tangent and relaxation exponent (n) values at the gel point demonstrated a less elastic nature of the complex solution with more NaCl. The results indicated the gel network was composed of entanglements and association of QHEC (as polymer network), as well as the electrostatic adsorption interaction between QHEC chains and NCC rods (as cross-linking). With the addition of NaCl, the screening effect led to the enhancement of the entanglements and weakening of the electrostatic adsorption, however, the gel strength decreased with increasing the NaCl amount, suggesting the electrostatic adsorption interaction played a more dominant role than the entanglements when the gel was formed. Moreover, the exponents of the scaling law η0 ∝-γ and Ge ∝z of the QHEC/NCC/NaCl solution revealed that the scaling law n = z/(z + γ) between n, γ, and z was only feasible at the highest NaCl concentration, as a result of that the intermolecular electrostatic interaction was completely screened, indicating the scaling law was only feasible when intermolecular interaction was small enough to be neglected.
Publication date
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationSecurity and Disruptive Technologies; National Research Council Canada
Peer reviewedYes
NPARC number21272610
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Record identifier0b768db5-3a4a-4c9b-aa0a-40611ea9bf57
Record created2014-12-03
Record modified2016-05-09
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