Hydration of ordinary Portland cement/high alumina cement pastes containing phosphonate compounds

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TypeArticle
Journal titleIndian Journal of Engineering and Materials Sciences
Volume3
Pages6369; # of pages: 7
SubjectAdmixtures
AbstractThe hydration process of ordinary/Portland cement (OPC)-high alumina cement (HAC) paste systemswith and without the phosphonate compounds, aminotri(methylene-phosphonic acid) (ATMP),1-hydroxyethylidene-l, l-diphosphonic acid (HEDP) and diethylenetriaminepenta (methylene-phosphonicacid) (DTPMP), was investigated using conduction calorimetric and impedance measurements.Conduction calorimetry provides relevant data on the heat development characteristics of the cement hydration reactions and the impedance spectroscopy characterizes changes in the microstructuraldevelopment and ionic concentration of the pore solution resulting from the hydration reactions. The presence of 0.05% phosphonate has little effect on the OPCIHAC paste system. At the 0.2% level, a reduction in the rate of heat evolution is observed. This indicates that the phosphonate compounds interfere with the gypsum-cement reactions especially in the pastes containing 0.2% ATMP and HEDP resulting in Portland cement hydration (mainly the C3S and C2S phases) retardation in an OPC/HAC blended system.
Publication date
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationNRC Institute for Research in Construction; National Research Council Canada
Peer reviewedYes
NRC number39248
5759
NPARC number20375711
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Record identifier0cace62e-a996-4968-98d4-ecfb396092e3
Record created2012-07-23
Record modified2016-05-09
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