Soy protein reduces triglyceride levels and triglyceride fatty acid fractional synthesis rate in hypercholesterolemic subjects

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DOIResolve DOI: http://doi.org/10.1016/j.atherosclerosis.2003.12.015
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TypeArticle
Journal titleAtherosclerosis
Volume173
IssueApril 2
Pages269275; # of pages: 7
SubjectSoy protein; Animal protein; Isoflavones; Lipid profiles; Cholesterol biosynthesis; Triglyceride fatty acid biosynthesis
AbstractTo examine the effects of protein source and isoflavones on triglyceride (TG) fatty acid (TGFA) and cholesterol biosynthesis, subjects (>50 years, LDL cholesterol >130 mg/dl) underwent a four-phase randomized cross-over feeding trial. Diets contained either isolated soy protein or common sources of animal protein (25 g/1000 kcal), without or with isoflavones (49 mg/1000 kcal) and were each fed for 6 weeks. Blood samples from 20 hyperlipidemic subjects (6M, 14F, 62 ± 9 years, BMI 26 ± 3 kg/m², LDL cholesterol >160 mg/dl after feeding animal protein without isoflavones) were selected to measure TGFA fractional synthetic rate (TGFA-FSR) and free cholesterol fractional synthetic rate (FC-FSR) over 24 h as deuterium oxide uptake into TGFA and free cholesterol. Soy protein reduced TG by 12.4% (P < 0.0001), total cholesterol by 4.4% (P < 0.001), and LDL cholesterol by 5.7% (P = 0.003) compared to animal protein. The TGFA-FSR was reduced by13.3% (P = 0.018) and FC-FSR was increased by 7.6% (P = 0.017) after the soy protein relative to the animal protein. Isoflavones had no significant effect on TG and TGFA-FSR. Isoflavones reduced total cholesterol levels by 3.1% (P = 0.009) but had no significant effect on LDL, HDL cholesterol levels, or FC-FSR. These data demonstrate that dietary protein type modulates circulating TG and cholesterol levels in hypercholesterolemic individuals by distinct mechanisms.
Publication date
PublisherElsevier
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationNational Research Council Canada
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Peer reviewedYes
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NRC number54695
NPARC number9145566
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Record identifier0e0166e1-f654-4056-bf73-c80bae4b0556
Record created2009-10-02
Record modified2016-05-09
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