Condensation risk assessment on box windows : the effect of the window-wall interface

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DOIResolve DOI: http://doi.org/10.1177/1744259111411653
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TypeArticle
Journal titleJournal of Building Physics
Volume36
Issue1
Pages3556; # of pages: 22
Subjectcondensation; window-wall interface; box window; pressure difference; deficiency; temperature index; laboratory experiment; guarded hot box; full-scale; Wall/Window interface
AbstractWindows generally have the lowest temperature index in current building types, and will consequently be the primary location for interior surface condensation. Surface temperatures can easily be calculated using thermal finite-element-models, but these generally omit the effect of convection in the windows and the window-wall interface. Hence, there is a need to determine if specific interface details provide potential for condensation on the window components in which air leakage paths may be prominent. The paper reports on a laboratory evaluation of condensation risk assessment in a hotbox, with varying pressure differences and the introduction of deficiencies. It was concluded that the effect of the type of insulation in the window-wall interface was very low for isobaric boundary conditions, whereas it has a significant effect when pressure differences are applied.
Publication date
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationNational Research Council Canada; NRC Institute for Research in Construction
Peer reviewedYes
NRC number54539
21876
NPARC number20374413
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Record identifier0e9044e4-48ca-4a69-a0f3-508dbcdcca4f
Record created2012-07-23
Record modified2016-05-09
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