Hydrogen bonding between anhydrous cholesterol and phosphatidylcholines : an infrared spectroscopic study

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DOIResolve DOI: http://doi.org/10.1016/0005-2736(89)90197-1
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TypeArticle
Journal titleBiochimica et Biophysica Acta (BBA) - Biomembranes
ISSN0005-2736
Volume980
Issue1
Pages3741
SubjectHydrogen bonding; Cholesterol; Phosphatidylcholine; Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy
AbstractFourier transform infrared spectroscopy performed with a high pressure diamond anvil cell was used to study hydrogen bonding between anhydrous phosphatidylcholines and cholesterol at the molar ratio 4:1. The hydroxyl group of cholesterol which acta as a proton donor, engages in strong hydrogen bonding to the sn-2 chain carbonyl group of DMPC, DPPC and HPPC and in weak hydrogen bonding to the phosphate group of all these phospholipids. No evidence of hydrogen bonding between cholesterol and the sn-1 chain carbonyl group of DMPC and DPPC was found. From a comparison of the relative hydrogen-bond strengths between cholesterol or water and the sn-2 chain carbonyl and phosphate groups of all these phospholipids, it is predicted that in aqueous dispersions of cholesterol containing phospholipids, the hydrogen bond of cholesterol to the phosphate group would be replaced by that of water, while the hydrogen bond of cholesterol to the sn-2 chain carbonyl group would remain intact.
Publication date
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationNational Research Council Canada
Peer reviewedYes
NPARC number23001183
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Record identifier0eb5bf4b-1079-4a14-a6b9-0e38f2057a7b
Record created2017-01-03
Record modified2017-01-03
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