Hysteretic effects in lateral nanostructures caused by long-lived quantum-Hall eddy currents

Download
  1. Get@NRC: Hysteretic effects in lateral nanostructures caused by long-lived quantum-Hall eddy currents (Opens in a new window)
DOIResolve DOI: http://doi.org/10.1016/j.physe.2006.03.020
AuthorSearch for: ; Search for: ; Search for: ; Search for: ; Search for: ; Search for: ; Search for: ; Search for:
TypeArticle
Journal titlePhysica E: Low-dimensional Systems and Nanostructures
Volume34
Issue1-2
Pages476479; # of pages: 4
AbstractCoulomb blockade studies of lateral quantum dots and measurements of the quantised conductance of quantum point contacts, in high magnetic fields, reveal novel features which are hysteretic in magnetic-field sweep direction. These features are associated with long-lived eddy currents, induced in the 2D electron gas leads in these devices as the magnetic field sweeps and the 2DEG enters the quantum Hall effect state. Torsion-balance magnetometry measurements confirm the presence of these induced currents, and their influence on the nanostructures. The decay of the eddy currents, after the magnetic field sweep is stopped, exhibits two distinct regimes: a fast initial exponential decay followed by a much longer power-law decay in which the size of the eddy current falls typically to 60% of its original value in one day. The interpretation of these observations is that the Coulomb blockade and quantum point contact devices are influenced by the local Hall potential at the edges of the 2DEG leads. The Hall potential changes the local chemical potential of the leads, and hence the properties of the devices, in a manner which reverses when the field sweep direction is reversed.
Publication date
AffiliationNational Research Council Canada; NRC Institute for Microstructural Sciences
Peer reviewedNo
NPARC number12744815
Export citationExport as RIS
Report a correctionReport a correction
Record identifier11640298-21bc-43b1-9603-6e878ef29221
Record created2009-10-27
Record modified2016-05-09
Bookmark and share
  • Share this page with Facebook (Opens in a new window)
  • Share this page with Twitter (Opens in a new window)
  • Share this page with Google+ (Opens in a new window)
  • Share this page with Delicious (Opens in a new window)