The Size of Lipid Rafts: An Atomic Force Microscopy Study of Ganglioside GM1 Domains in Sphingomyelin/DOPC/Cholesterol Membranes

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TypeArticle
Journal titleBiophys. J.
Volume82
Issue5
Pages25262535; # of pages: 10
AbstractAtomic force microscopy has been used to study the distribution of ganglioside GM1 in model membranes composed of ternary lipid mixtures that mimic the composition of lipid rafts. The results demonstrate that addition of 1% GM1 to 1:1:1 sphingomyelin/dioleoylphosphatidylcholine/cholesterol monolayers leads to the formation of small ganglioside-rich microdomains (40-100 nm in size) that are localized preferentially in the more ordered sphingomyelin/cholesterol-rich phase. With 5% GM1 some GM1 microdomains are also detected in the dioleoylphosphatidylcholine-rich phase. A similar preferential localization of GM1 in the ordered phase is observed for bilayers with the same ternary lipid mixture in the upper leaflet. The small GM1-rich domains observed in these experiments are similar to the sizes for lipid rafts in natural membranes but considerably smaller than the ordered bilayer domains that have been shown to be enriched in GM1 in recent fluorescence microscopy studies of lipid bilayers. The combined data from a number of studies of model membranes indicate that lateral organization occurs on a variety of length scales and mimics many of the properties of natural membranes.
Publication date
Linkhttp://www.biophysj.org/cgi/content/abstract/82/5/2526
AffiliationNational Research Council Canada; NRC Steacie Institute for Molecular Sciences
Peer reviewedNo
NPARC number12328395
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Record identifier11651872-b791-480e-a6f5-086dd1ebe043
Record created2009-09-10
Record modified2016-05-09
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