Disorder and defect formation mechanisms in molecular-beam-epitaxy grown silicon epilayers

Download
  1. Get@NRC: Disorder and defect formation mechanisms in molecular-beam-epitaxy grown silicon epilayers (Opens in a new window)
DOIResolve DOI: http://doi.org/10.1016/j.tsf.2012.11.140
AuthorSearch for: ; Search for: ; Search for: ; Search for: ; Search for:
TypeArticle
Journal titleThin Solid Films
ISSN0040-6090
Volume527
Pages3844; # of pages: 7
SubjectMolecular beam epitaxy; Disordered silicon; Defects; Electron spin resonance; Microstructure
AbstractWe investigate the role of disorder, stress and crystallite size in determining the density of defects in disordered and partially ordered silicon thin films deposited at low or moderate temperatures by molecular beam epitaxy. We find that the paramagnetic defect density measured by electron spin resonance (ESR) is strongly dependent on the growth temperature of the films, decreasing from ~ 2·1019 cm- 3 at 98 C to ~ 1·10 18 cm- 3 at 572 C. The physical nature of the defects is strongly dependent on the range of order in the films: ESR spectra consistent with dangling bonds in an amorphous phase are observed at the lowest temperatures, while the ESR signal gradually becomes more anisotropic as medium-range order improves and the stress level (measured both by X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy) is released in more crystalline films. Anisotropic ESR spectra consistent with paramagnetic defects embedded in an epitaxial phase are observed at the highest growth temperature (572 C).
Publication date
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationNational Research Council Canada (NRC-CNRC); Information and Communication Technologies; Measurement Science and Standards
Peer reviewedYes
NPARC number21269836
Export citationExport as RIS
Report a correctionReport a correction
Record identifier1185aa14-f6fc-4162-8687-597caedc8ad3
Record created2013-12-13
Record modified2016-05-09
Bookmark and share
  • Share this page with Facebook (Opens in a new window)
  • Share this page with Twitter (Opens in a new window)
  • Share this page with Google+ (Opens in a new window)
  • Share this page with Delicious (Opens in a new window)