Quantitative nonlinear optical assessment of atherosclerosis progression in rabbits

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DOIResolve DOI: http://doi.org/10.1021/ac5005635
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TypeArticle
Journal titleAnalytical Chemistry
ISSN1520-6882
Volume86
Issue13
Pages63466354; # of pages: 9
SubjectBlood vessels; Optical correlation; Atherosclerotic lesions; Atherosclerotic plaque; Fluorescence imaging; Microscopic image; Non-linear optical; Numerical matrices; Positive correlations; Quantitative approach; Diseases
AbstractQuantification of atherosclerosis has been a challenging task owing to its complex pathology. In this study, we validated a quantitative approach for assessing atherosclerosis progression in a rabbit model using a numerical matrix, optical index for plaque burden, derived directly from the nonlinear optical microscopic images captured on the atherosclerosis-affected blood vessel. A positive correlation between this optical index and the severity of atherosclerotic lesions, represented by the age of the rabbits, was established based on data collected from 21 myocardial infarction-prone Watanabe heritable hyperlipidemic rabbits with age ranging between new-born and 27 months old. The same optical index also accurately identified high-risk locations for atherosclerotic plaque formation along the entire aorta, which was validated by immunohistochemical fluorescence imaging. © 2014 American Chemical Society.
Publication date
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationNational Research Council Canada (NRC-CNRC); Medical Devices (MD-DM)
Peer reviewedYes
NPARC number21272255
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Record identifier1439c653-f05f-41c4-aa7a-83b776fb6e16
Record created2014-07-23
Record modified2016-05-09
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