Multiband sensor using thick holographic gratings for sulfur detection by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

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DOIResolve DOI: http://doi.org/10.1364/AO.51.0000B7
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TypeArticle
Journal titleApplied Optics
ISSN0003-6935
Volume51
Issue7
PagesB7B12
SubjectEfficient systems; High-end systems; Limit of detection; Multi-band sensors; Near-IR; Novel concept; Output signal; Oxygen molecule; Signal integration; Spectral filtering; Sulfur detection; Temporal synchronization; Vacuum UV; Atomic emission spectroscopy; Holographic gratings; Sulfur; Signal detection
AbstractDetection of sulfur by optical emission spectroscopy generally presents some difficulties because the strongest lines are in the vacuum UV below 185 nm and therefore are readily absorbed by oxygen molecules in air. A novel concept for a low-cost and efficient system to detect sulfur using near-IR bands by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy is here proposed. This concept is based on customized thick holographic gratings as spectral filtering elements. The signal integration and the temporal synchronization are performed using built-in custom electronics that amplify and integrate or trigger photodiode output signals. In this work, we use the near-IR lines at 921.287 nm and a background reference at 900 nm. Preliminary results show a limit of detection comparable to that of a conventional high-end system. © 2012 Optical Society of America.
Publication date
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationNational Research Council Canada (NRC-CNRC); NRC Industrial Materials Institute (IMI-IMI)
Peer reviewedYes
NPARC number21269256
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Record identifier1545fd7b-1e2a-48e5-b85b-ba6a59777e6f
Record created2013-12-12
Record modified2016-05-09
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