Multi-year ice thickness: knowns and unknowns

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TypeArticle
Proceedings titleProceedings of the 20th International Conference on Port and Ocean Engineering under Arctic Conditions June 9-12, 2009 Luleå, Sweden
Series titlePOAC'11
ConferenceThe 20th International Conference on Port and Ocean Engineering under Arctic Conditions June 9-12, 2009 Luleå, Sweden
ISSN0376-6756
2077-7841
Article numberPOAC09-120
AbstractNearly 5000 direct measurements of multi-year ice thickness, compiled from studies spanning a period of 51 years, are used to identify some of the “knowns and unknowns” surrounding multiyear ice. Many of these studies reside in the grey literature, which makes this paper one the few in the open literature to include data from these not-often-seen reports. Individual thickness measurements on multi-year ice suggest that floes from the Beaufort, Central Canadian Arctic, High Arctic and Sverdrup Basin are of comparable thickness. The thickest multi-year ice, 40.2 m, was measured on a pressure ridge in the Canadian Beaufort. On average, the mean thickness is 5.6 m (±2.2 m) for a relatively level multi-year floe and 9.9 m (±4.7 m) for a pressure ridge. Floes with a mean thicknesses of 11.3 m, and pressure ridges with a mean thickness of 24.7 m have been measured, however.
Publication date
Linkhttp://www.poac.com/PapersOnline.html
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationOcean, Coastal and River Engineering; National Research Council Canada
Peer reviewedYes
NPARC number21277249
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Record identifier15b81ab8-4582-4272-9f8c-ff99f9c09cba
Record created2016-01-22
Record modified2016-05-09
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