Determination of mercury in gasoline by photochemical vapor generation coupled to graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry

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DOIResolve DOI: http://doi.org/10.1016/j.microc.2014.06.001
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TypeArticle
Journal titleMicrochemical Journal
ISSN0026-265X
Volume117
Pages100105; # of pages: 6
AbstractQuantitation of mercury in gasoline by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry following its photochemical vapor generation is described. Samples were prepared as a mixture of gasoline and propan-2-ol. A high efficiency flow through 19W photochemical vapor generator was used to process prepared samples with in-situ collection of the resultant Hg0 vapor onto reduced palladium in the graphite tube. Response from inorganic and organomercury standards added to the samples did not differ significantly. A limit of detection and characteristic mass of 0.1μgL-¹ and 0.6ng were obtained, respectively. Relative standard deviations of replicate measurements of 3.0ngmL-1 added Hg(II) were typically 7-8%. Recoveries of spikes from samples ranged from 90 to 97%. The concentration of mercury in all tested samples of gasoline was below the limit of quantitation (0.3μgL-¹). The method was rapid, efficient, green, fit-for-purpose, responsive to both inorganic and organic mercury species and should also respond to any Hg0 endogenously present in the sample. © 2014 Elsevier B.V.
Publication date
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationNational Research Council Canada (NRC-CNRC); Measurement Science and Standards
Peer reviewedYes
NPARC number21272173
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Record identifier165dd3a0-dd3a-40a1-8ed3-6569e57f6ef2
Record created2014-07-23
Record modified2016-05-09
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