Effects of composition of hardener on the curing and aging for an epoxy resin system

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DOIResolve DOI: http://doi.org/10.1002/app.22493
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TypeArticle
Journal titleJournal of Polymer Science
Volume99
Issue2
Pages580588; # of pages: 9
Subjectaging; curing of polymers; epoxy; hardener; kinetics
AbstractDifferent mixture ratios of Shell Epon 828 (based on diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A, DGEBA) and Shell EPI-CURE 3046 (based on triethylenetetramine, TETA) were evaluated under different environments of isothermal curing at 80°C in DSC, room temperature curing in air, and aging in water at 45°C. The curing reactions were monitored using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA), and infrared spectroscopy (IR). It was shown that the initial curing rate increased with the amount of hardener. However, the epoxy groups in samples with excess hardener were prone to reaction with primary amines located at the ends of TETA molecules, resulting in a less dense epoxy network. During aging in water at 45°C, significant effects of water on the postcure and the increased water absorption with an increase of hardener amount were observed. The DMA results show that the samples with hardener around stoichiometric composition have the greatest storage modulus while curing in air environment. However, the samples with hardener much less than stoichiometric composition have greater storage modulus under aging in water at 45°C.
Publication date
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationNational Research Council Canada (NRC-CNRC); NRC Industrial Materials Institute
Peer reviewedYes
NRC number47923
NPARC number15861569
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Record identifier170c387c-ced2-4810-b1e9-5d772f26951a
Record created2010-07-30
Record modified2016-05-09
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