Spectroscopic assessment of cutaneous hemodynamics in the presence of high epidermal melanin concentration

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DOIResolve DOI: http://doi.org/10.1016/S0009-8981(01)00796-3
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TypeArticle
Journal titleClinica Chimica Acta
Volume317
Issue1-2
Pages203212; # of pages: 10
SubjectIn vivo spectroscopy; Skin perfusion; Tissue oxygenation; Pressure ulcers; Blanch response; Projection operators
AbstractBackground: For individuals with lightly pigmented skin, early stage pressure ulcers appear as areas of redness, which have compromised microcirculation and do not blanch in response to pressure. The lack of a visible blanch (hemodynamic response) to pressure is a convenient diagnostic test for stage I sores. However, the blanch response is not visually apparent in people with highly pigmented skin color due to the overwhelming contribution of melanin to the reflectance of skin. Methods: A simple least squares projection operator method is described, which can separate the reflectance contributions from melanin and hemoglobin. The methodology was tested in a study population of 20 subjects with healthy skin. The study population was evenly divided into a lightly pigmented skin group (visible blanch response) and a highly pigmented skin group (no visible blanch response). Results: The hemodynamic response to pressure being applied to the skin could clearly be distinguished spectroscopically in both groups at a high level of statistical significance. Conclusion: The specific aim of this work was directed towards developing a spectroscopic basis for distinguishing the healthy blanch response in a manner that was independent of skin pigmentation. However, the technique has a general application when optical hemodynamic measurements are being made over a diverse patient population or under conditions of varying pigmentation such as the seasonal changes in skin color.
Publication date
PublisherElsevier Science B.V.
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationNRC Institute for Biodiagnostics; National Research Council Canada
Peer reviewedYes
NRC number1944
NPARC number9148021
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Record identifier170eb1e7-cc32-469c-a7fe-e7d3fe7012f4
Record created2009-06-25
Record modified2016-09-19
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