Atomic Force Microscopy Force Mapping in the Study of Supported Lipid Bilayers

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DOIResolve DOI: http://doi.org/10.1021/la103927a
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TypeArticle
Journal titleLangmuir
Volume27
Issue4
Pages13081313; # of pages: 6
AbstractInvestigating the structural and mechanical properties of lipid bilayer membrane systems is vital in elucidating their biological function. One route to directly correlate the morphology of phase-segregatedmembranes with their indentation and rupture mechanics is the collection of atomic force microscopy (AFM) force maps. These force maps, while containing rich mechanical information, require lengthy processing time due to the large number of force curves needed to attain a high spatial resolution.Aforce curve analysis toolset was created to perform data extraction, calculation and reporting specifically in studying lipid membrane morphology and mechanical stability. The procedure was automated to allow for high-throughput processing of force maps with greatly reduced processing time. The resulting program was successfully used in systematically analyzing a number of supported lipid membrane systems in the investigation of their structure and nanomechanics.
Publication date
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationNational Research Council Canada; NRC Steacie Institute for Molecular Sciences
Peer reviewedYes
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This is a non-NRC publication

"Non-NRC publications" are publications authored by NRC employees prior to their employment by NRC.

NPARC number17364204
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Record identifier172e1165-4ba7-413b-8b8d-e56c22df7601
Record created2011-03-22
Record modified2016-05-09
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