Transient gene expression in HEK293 cells : Peptone addition posttransfection improves recombinant protein synthesis

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DOIResolve DOI: http://doi.org/10.1002/bit.20428
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TypeArticle
Journal titleBiotechnology and Bioengineering
Volume90
Issue3
Pages332344; # of pages: 13
AbstractGene expression by large-scale transfection of mammalian cells is becoming an established technology for the fast production of milligram and even gram amounts of recombinant proteins (r-proteins). However, efforts are still needed to optimize production parameters in order to maximize volumetric productivities while maintaining product quality. In this study, transfection efficiency and volumetric productivity following transient gene expression in HEK293 cells were evaluated using green fluorescent protein (GFP) and human placental secreted alkaline phosphatase (SEAP) as reporter genes. We show that a single pulse of peptones (protein hydrolysates) to the cultures performed in a low serum (1%, v/v) and in serum-free medium results in a significant increase in volumetric protein productivity. Sixteen peptones from different sources were tested and almost all of them showed a positive effect on r-protein production. This effect, however, is time- and concentration-dependent. By using Tryptone N1 (a casein peptone, TN1) to feed the cultures at 24 h posttransfection (hpt), a 2-fold increase in volumetric SEAP productivity was obtained 5 days posttransfection. This effect was shown to be equal to that obtained when the culture was fed with a supplementary 4% (v/v) of serum. The positive effect of TN1 on protein production was also demonstrated with Tie2 protein ectodomain produced in serum-free medium. HPLC analysis of amino acids consumption/production during control batch and TN1 pulse culture showed some major differences in amino acid metabolism when using TN1 pulse. Asparagine, glycine, histidine, threonine, leucine, and valine show accumulation in the medium over the cultivation period instead of being consumed as observed in unfed sample (except for asparagine, which remained unchanged). Isoleucine, tyrosine, methionine, and phenylalanine all remained unchanged or slightly fluctuated in TN1-fed culture after the feeding pulse, while they were all steadily consumed in the control run. The relative abundance of SEAP's mRNA suggests that the improvement in protein yield results both from an increase of the translational activity and transcription efficiency. Further understanding of mechanisms by which amino acids/peptides regulate transcriptional and translational machinery in mammalian cells should facilitate the design of new strategies for the improvement of r-protein production by large-scale transfection. � 2005 Government of Canada.
Publication date
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationNational Research Council Canada; NRC Biotechnology Research Institute
Peer reviewedNo
NPARC number12328919
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Record identifier1a0b40c0-ba81-4c27-8559-b52ccdbb9c84
Record created2009-09-10
Record modified2016-05-09
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