Different cold spray deposition strategies : single- and multi-layers to repair aluminium alloy components

Alternative titleDifferent cold spray deposition strategies : single and multi layers to repair aluminium alloy components
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DOIResolve DOI: http://doi.org/10.1007/s11666-014-0141-y
AuthorSearch for: ; Search for: ; Search for: ; Search for: ; Search for: ; Search for:
TypeArticle
Proceedings titleJournal of Thermal Spray Technology
Conference2011 International Thermal Spray Conference, September 27–29, 2011, Hamburg, Germany
ISSN1059-9630
1544-1016
Volume23
Issue8
Pages12371250; # of pages: 14
Subjectaircraft; feedstock; processing; testing
AbstractCold spraying is increasingly being used for reconstruction or repair of damaged aluminium alloy components, especially in the aviation industry. Both thin (<0.5 mm) and thick (up to 1 cm) coatings are necessary to achieve dimensional recovery of such components. Thin and above all thick coatings can be deposited in a single pass (single layer) or in several passes (multi-pass), resulting in different thermal and stress effects in the component and the coating itself. The thermal input, the amount and type of residual stresses and the porosity affect various characteristics such as adhesion, crack propagation and mechanical properties of the coating. In this study, two sets (single- and multi-pass) of aluminium alloy (AA6061) coatings with different thicknesses (0.5 mm to 2 mm) were deposited onto AA6061 substrates and compared using metallographic and fractographic analyses, four-point bending testing, residual stress analysis and Vickers microhardness indentation. Finally, the coating adhesion and cohesion were measured using the standard ASTM-C633 adhesion test and tubular coating tensile test. This study demonstrates that the single-layer strategy results in greater adhesion and lower porosity, while multilayer coatings have higher elastic modulus. Independent of the strategy, the compressive residual stress decreases as a function of coating thickness.
Publication date
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationNRC Industrial Materials Institute; Automotive and Surface Transportation; National Research Council Canada
Peer reviewedYes
NRC numberNRC-AST-147062
NPARC number21272354
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Record identifier1b689db4-1d37-439a-82ac-e7de4412d284
Record created2014-11-24
Record modified2016-05-09
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