Progress toward development of low-temperature microwave refractive index gas thermometry at NRC

Download
  1. (PDF, 2 MB)
  2. Get@NRC: Progress toward development of low-temperature microwave refractive index gas thermometry at NRC (Opens in a new window)
DOIResolve DOI: http://doi.org/10.1007/s10765-014-1728-8
AuthorSearch for: ; Search for:
TypeArticle
Journal titleInternational Journal of Thermophysics
ISSN0195-928X
Volume36
Issue2
Pages205228; # of pages: 24
SubjectElectromagnetic resonance; Gas thermometers; Low temperatures; Microwave refractive index; Microwaves
AbstractProgress toward the development of a low-temperature microwave refractive index gas thermometry implementation for primary thermometry at NRC is reported. A prototype quasi-spherical copper resonator has been integrated into a cryogenic system with a 5 K base temperature, and preliminary microwave measurements in vacuum have been completed to characterize the resonator between 5 K and 297 K. The dependence of experimental results on spectral fitting background terms, 1st- and 2nd-order shape corrections, and waveguide corrections has also been explored. The current NRC results agree with previous room-temperature measurements on the same resonator at NIST, and indicate no significant change in resonator shape between room temperature and low temperature. The temperature dependences of the resonator electrical conductivity and linear thermal expansion coefficient, as obtained from the microwave resonances, agree with published literature values for oxygen-free high-conductivity copper measured using other techniques.
Publication date
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationMeasurement Science and Standards; National Research Council Canada
Peer reviewedYes
NPARC number21272828
Export citationExport as RIS
Report a correctionReport a correction
Record identifier1c57847b-a15d-4dca-bad6-d82c8f5c9251
Record created2014-12-03
Record modified2016-05-09
Bookmark and share
  • Share this page with Facebook (Opens in a new window)
  • Share this page with Twitter (Opens in a new window)
  • Share this page with Google+ (Opens in a new window)
  • Share this page with Delicious (Opens in a new window)