Biodegradation of multiple microcystins and cylindrospermopsin in clarifier sludge and a drinking water source: effects of particulate attached bacteria and phycocyanin

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DOIResolve DOI: http://doi.org/10.1016/j.ecoenv.2015.06.001
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TypeArticle
Journal titleEcotoxicology and Environmental Safety
ISSN0147-6513
Volume120
Pages409417; # of pages: 9
SubjectBiodegradation; Microcystin; Cylindrospermopsin; Clarifier sludge; Phycocyanin; Sludge management
AbstractThe effects of particulate attached bacteria (PAB) and phycocyanin on the simultaneous biodegradation of a mixture of microcystin-LR, YR, LY, LW, LF and cylindrospermopsin (CYN) was assessed in clarifier sludge of a drinking water treatment plant (DWTP) and in a drinking water source. The biomass from lake water and clarifier sludge was able to degrade all microcystins (MCs) at initial concentrations of 10μgL-1 with pseudo-first order reaction half-lives ranging from 2.3 to 8.8 days. CYN was degraded only in the sludge with a biodegradation rate of 1.0×10-1d-1 and a half-life of 6.0 days. This is the first study reporting multiple MCs and CYN biodegradation in the coagulation-flocculation sludge of a DWTP. The removal of PAB from the lake water and the sludge prolonged the lag time substantially, such that no biodegradation of MCLY, LW and LF was observed within 24 days. Biodegradation rates were shown to increase in the presence of C-phycocyanin as a supplementary carbon source for indigenous bacteria, a cyanobacterial product that accompanies cyanotoxins during cyanobacteria blooms. MCs in mixtures degraded more slowly (or not at all) than if they were degraded individually, an important outcome as MCs in the environment are often present in mixtures. The results from this study showed that the majority of the bacterial biomass responsible for the biodegradation of cyanotoxins is associated with particles or biological flocs and there is a potential for extreme accumulation of cyanotoxins within the DWTP during a transient bloom. © 2015 Elsevier Inc.
Publication date
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationNational Research Council Canada (NRC-CNRC); Energy, Mining and Environment
Peer reviewedYes
NPARC number21277002
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Record identifier1d804175-cbdd-4d20-967e-39c1df21bda2
Record created2015-11-10
Record modified2016-05-09
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