Advanced MR imaging techniques and characterization of residual anatomy

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DOIResolve DOI: http://doi.org/10.1016/j.clineuro.2012.01.003
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TypeArticle
Journal titleClinical Neurology and Neurosurgery
ISSN03038467
Volume114
Issue5
Pages460470
SubjectMagnetic resonance imaging (MRI); Clinical applications; Functional MRI; Diffusion tensor imaging; Perfusion; Relaxation times; Multiple sclerosis; Traumatic brain injury
AbstractAdvances in technology in recent decades have contributed to rapid developments in non-invasive methods for imaging human anatomy, and advanced imaging methods are now one of the primary tools for clinical diagnosis after neurological trauma or disease. Here we review the current and upcoming capabilities of one of the most rapidly developing methods, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The underlying theory is introduced so that the reasons for the strengths, weaknesses, and future expectations of this method, can be explained. Current techniques for imaging anatomical changes, inflammation, and changes in white matter, axonal integrity, blood flow and function, are reviewed. Applications for specific purposes of assessing traumatic injury in the brain or spinal cord, and for multiple-sclerosis are also presented, and are used as examples of how the advanced techniques are being used in practice.
Publication date
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationMedical Devices; National Research Council Canada
Peer reviewedYes
IdentifierS0303846712000145
NPARC number21268703
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Record identifier1e872076-60a3-42eb-b0c2-dfa447cb36a1
Record created2013-11-07
Record modified2016-05-09
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