Effects of chenodeoxycholic acid and deoxycholic acid on cholesterol absorption and metabolism in humans

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DOIResolve DOI: http://doi.org/10.1016/j.lab.2006.03.009
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TypeArticle
Journal titleTranslational Research
Volume148
Issue1
Pages3745; # of pages: 9
Subjectchenodeoxycholic acid; cholesterol; metabolism; deoxycholic acid; dietary supplements
AbstractQuantitative and qualitative differences in intralumenal bile acids may affect cholesterol absorption and metabolism. To test this hypothesis, 2 cross-over outpatient studies were conducted in adults with apo-A IV 1/1 or apo-E 3/3 genotypes. Study 1 included 11 subjects 24 to 37 years of age, taking 15 mg/kg/day chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA) or no bile acid for 20 days while being fed a controlled diet. Study 2 included 9 adults 25 to 38 years of age, taking 15 mg/kg/day deoxycholic acid (DCA) or no bile acid, following the same experimental design and procedures as study 1. CDCA had no effect on plasma lipid concentrations, whereas DCA decreased (P < 0.05) plasma high-density lipoprotein (HDL)-cholesterol and tended to decrease (P = 0.15) low-density lipoprotein (LDL)-cholesterol. CDCA treatment enriched (P < 0.0001) bile with CDCA and increased cholesterol concentration in micelles, whereas meal-stimulated bile acid concentrations were decreased. DCA treatment enriched (P < 0.0001) bile with DCA and tended to increase intralumenal cholesterol solubilized in micelles (P = 0.06). No changes were found in cholesterol absorption, free cholesterol fractional synthetic rate (FSR), or 3-hydroxy-3 methylglutaryl (HMG) CoA reductase and LDL receptor messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) levels after CDCA treatment. DCA supplementation tended to decrease cholesterol absorption and reciprocally increase FSR and HMG CoA reductase and LDL receptor mRNA levels. Results of these 2 studies suggest that the solubilization of cholesterol in the intestinal micelles is not a rate-limiting step for its absorption.
Publication date
PublisherElsevier
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationNational Research Council Canada; NRC Institute for Nutrisciences and Health
Access conditionavailable
unlimited
public
Peer reviewedYes
NRC number50152
NPARC number9148605
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Record identifier2032a40d-92c6-4b70-9466-761c30a9c630
Record created2009-10-02
Record modified2016-05-09
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