Plant and bird presence strongly influences the microbial communities in soils of Admiralty Bay, Maritime Antarctica

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DOIResolve DOI: http://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0066109
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TypeArticle
Journal titlePLoS ONE
ISSN1932-6203
Volume8
Issue6
Article numbere66109
Subjectnitrogen; RNA 16S; Acidobacteria; Antarctica; article; Colobanthus quitensis; community structure; controlled study; Deschampsia antarctica; environmental factor; Firmicutes; greenhouse effect; microarray analysis; microbial community; nitrogen concentration; nonhuman; penguin; plant; polymerase chain reaction; population abundance; rhizosphere; sampling; soil microflora; species distribution; taxon
AbstractUnderstanding the environmental factors that shape microbial communities is crucial, especially in extreme environments, like Antarctica. Two main forces were reported to influence Antarctic soil microbes: birds and plants. Both birds and plants are currently undergoing relatively large changes in their distribution and abundance due to global warming. However, we need to clearly understand the relationship between plants, birds and soil microorganisms. We therefore collected rhizosphere and bulk soils from six different sampling sites subjected to different levels of bird influence and colonized by Colobanthus quitensis and Deschampsia antarctica in Admiralty Bay, King George Island, Maritime Antarctic. Microarray and qPCR assays targeting 16S rRNA genes of specific taxa were used to assess microbial community structure, composition and abundance and analyzed with a range of soil physico-chemical parameters. The results indicated significant rhizosphere effects in four out of the six sites, including areas with different levels of bird influence. Acidobacteria were significantly more abundant in soils with little bird influence (low nitrogen) and in bulk soil. In contrast, Actinobacteria were significantly more abundant in the rhizosphere of both plant species. At two of the sampling sites under strong bird influence (penguin colonies), Firmicutes were significantly more abundant in D. antarctica rhizosphere but not in C. quitensis rhizosphere. The Firmicutes were also positively and significantly correlated to the nitrogen concentrations in the soil. We conclude that the microbial communities in Antarctic soils are driven both by bird and plants, and that the effect is taxa-specific. © 2013 Teixeira et al.
Publication date
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationNational Research Council Canada (NRC-CNRC); NRC Biotechnology Research Institute (BRI-IRB)
Peer reviewedYes
NPARC number21269986
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Record identifier20afb806-eb78-4b2c-9ad2-2bf924cce7dc
Record created2013-12-13
Record modified2016-05-09
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