Study of free oligosaccharides derived from the bacterial N-glycosylation pathway

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DOIResolve DOI: http://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.0903078106
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TypeArticle
Journal titleProceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
Volume106
Issue35
Pages1501915024; # of pages: 6
SubjectCampylobacter jejuni; N-linked protein glycosylation; periplasmic glucans; osmolarity
AbstractThe food-borne pathogen Campylobacter jejuni is one of the leading causes of bacterial gastroenteritis worldwide and the most frequent antecedent in neuropathies such as the Guillain-Barré and Miller Fisher syndromes. C. jejuni was demonstrated to possess an N-linked protein glycosylation pathway that adds a conserved heptasaccharide to >40 periplasmic and membrane proteins. Recently, we showed that C. jejuni also produces free heptasaccharides derived from the N-glycan pathway reminiscent of the free oligosaccharides (fOS) produced by eukaryotes. Herein, we demonstrate that C. jejuni fOS are produced in response to changes in the osmolarity of the environment and bacterial growth phase.Weprovide evidence showing the conserved WWDYG motif of the oligosaccharyltransferase, PglB, is necessary for fOS release into the periplasm. This report demonstrates that fOS from an N-glycosylation pathway in bacteria are potentially equivalent to osmoregulated periplasmic glucans in other Gram-negative organisms.
Publication date
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationNational Research Council Canada (NRC-CNRC); NRC Institute for Biological Sciences
Peer reviewedYes
NPARC number15551585
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Record identifier20f21fd0-28f7-42e0-956a-575277b95284
Record created2010-08-16
Record modified2016-05-09
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