Tissue response to the components of a hydroxyapatite-coated composite femoral implant

Download
  1. (PDF, 1 MB)
  2. Get@NRC: Tissue response to the components of a hydroxyapatite-coated composite femoral implant (Opens in a new window)
DOIResolve DOI: http://doi.org/10.1002/jbm.a.32758
AuthorSearch for: ; Search for: ; Search for: ; Search for: ; Search for:
TypeArticle
Journal titleJournal of Biomedical Materials Research Part A
Volume94A
Issue3
Pages953960; # of pages: 8
Subjecthip implant; carbon fiber composites; hydroxyapatite coating; tissue response; bone apposition
AbstractBone loss around femoral implants used for THA is a persistent clinical concern. It may be caused by stress shielding, generally attributed to a mismatch in stiffness between the implants and host bone. In this regard, a fatigue resistant, carbon fiber (CF) composite femoral implant with bone-matching stiffness has been developed. This study evaluated the tissue response to the three material components of this implant in normal and textured (blasted with 24 grit alumina) surfaces: the hydroxyapatite (HA) coating, the CF composite and the intermediate crystalline HA particulate composite layer to bond to the HA coating (blended). Sprague-Dawley rats underwent bilateral femoral implantation each receiving two rod-like implants. Bone apposition to the HA (37%) and textured Ti (41%) implants was not significantly different. Bone apposition to the untextured CF (14%) and blended (19%) implants and polished Ti (8%) implants was significantly lower. Bone apposition to the textured CF (9%) and blended (11%) implants was lower (but not statistically from the as received or untextured counterparts). Nearly all sections from femurs containing CF implants presented CF debris. There was no evidence of localized bone loss or any strong immune response associated with any of the implant materials. All materials were well tolerated with minimal inflammation despite the presence of particulate debris. The high degree of bone apposition to the HA-coated composite implants and the lack of short-term inflammation and adverse tissue response to the three material implant component support continued evaluation of this composite technology for use in THA.
Publication date
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationNational Research Council Canada (NRC-CNRC); NRC Industrial Materials Institute
Peer reviewedYes
NRC number52369
NPARC number16001656
Export citationExport as RIS
Report a correctionReport a correction
Record identifier2186e63e-f968-465f-a1b9-02b0a3046c4e
Record created2010-08-30
Record modified2016-05-09
Bookmark and share
  • Share this page with Facebook (Opens in a new window)
  • Share this page with Twitter (Opens in a new window)
  • Share this page with Google+ (Opens in a new window)
  • Share this page with Delicious (Opens in a new window)