Re-inventing multimode interference couplers using subwavelength gratings

DOIResolve DOI: http://doi.org/10.1109/CLEOE-IQEC.2013.6801454
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TypeArticle
Proceedings title2013 Conference on Lasers & Electro-Optics Europe & International Quantum Electronics Conference CLEO EUROPE/IQEC
Conference2013 Conference on Lasers & Electro-Optics Europe & International Quantum Electronics Conference CLEO EUROPE/IQEC, May 12-16 2013, Munich, Germany
ISBN978-1-4799-0593-5
Pages11
SubjectBragg gratings; Talbot effect; Integrated optoelectronics; Light interference; Optical couplers; Refractive index
AbstractMultimode-Interference (MMI) devices are fundamental building blocks in photonic integrated circuits, where they are used for power splitting and combining, optical switches and modulators, Mach-Zehnder interferometers and 90o hybrids for coherent optical receivers. MMIs are based on the self-image principle, by which the guided modes of the multimode region interfere to form replicas of the input field with specific amplitude and phase relations. These relations are known to depend on i) the core/cladding refractive indexes (n₁/n₂), ii) the core width (W) and length (L) of the multimode region and iii) the number, width and position of the access ports. In this work, we show that by using sub-wavelength structures within an MMI, the self-imaging properties can be significantly altered, leading to ultra-short or ultra-broadband devices.
Publication date
PublisherIEEE
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationInformation and Communication Technologies; National Research Council Canada
Peer reviewedYes
NPARC number23000596
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Record identifier21bcf016-0a8b-46f4-9250-8f72e7bc3981
Record created2016-08-04
Record modified2016-08-04
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