Near-infrared spectroscopic imaging for skin hydration : the long and the short of it

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DOIResolve DOI: http://doi.org/10.1002/bip.10056
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TypeArticle
Journal titleBiopolymers
Volume67
Issue2
Pages96106; # of pages: 11
Subjectnear IR; spectroscopic imaging; skin; hydration; in vivo; epidermis
AbstractNear-IR spectroscopic methods have been developed to determine the degree of hydration of human skin in vivo. Noncontact reflectance spectroscopic imaging was used to investigate the distribution of skin moisture as a function of location. A human study in a clinical setting has generated quantitative data showing the effects of a drying agent and a moisturizer on delineated regions of the forearms of eight volunteers. Two digital imaging systems equipped with liquid-crystal tunable filters were used to collect stacks of monochromatic images at 10-nm intervals over the 650–1050 and 960–1700 nm wavelength bands. Synthetic images generated from measurements of water absorption band areas at three different near-IR wavelengths (970, 1200, and 1450 nm) showed obvious differences in the apparent distribution of water in the skin. Changes resulting from the skin treatments were much more evident in the long-wavelength images than in the short-wavelength ones. The variable sensitivity of the method at different wavelengths has been interpreted as being the result of different penetration depths of the IR light used in the reflectance studies.
Publication date
PublisherJohn Wiley & Sons, Inc.
AffiliationNational Research Council Canada; NRC Institute for Biodiagnostics
Peer reviewedYes
NRC number1904
NPARC number9742445
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Record identifier24a2e062-1004-4c3a-a710-4dfc4f23cfe1
Record created2009-07-17
Record modified2016-09-29
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