Young stars at the edge: stellar clustering in the outer regions of the M33 Disk

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DOIResolve DOI: http://doi.org/10.1088/2041-8205/728/1/L23
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TypeArticle
Journal titleAstrophysical journal letters
Volume728
Issue1
PagesL23-1L23-4; # of pages: 4
Subjectgalaxies: evolution; galaxies: individual (M33); galaxies: spiral
AbstractWe investigate the distribution of bright main-sequence stars near the northern edge of the M33 disk. Clustering on sub-kiloparsec scales is seen among stars with ages similar to 10 Myr, and two large star-forming complexes are identified. Similar large-scale grouping is not evident among stars with ages 100 Myr. Stars of this age are also distributed over a much larger area than those with younger ages, and it is argued that random stellar motions alone, as opposed to orderly motions of the type spurred by large-scale secular effects, can re-distribute stars out to distances of at least 2 kpc (i.e., one disk scale length) from their birthplaces on 100 Myr timescales. Such random motions may thus play a significant role in populating the outer regions of the M33 disk. Finally, it is suggested that-to the extent that the ambient properties of the outer disk mirror those in the main body of the disk-stars in this part of M33 may have formed in star clusters with masses 50-250 M(circle dot), which is substantially lower than the peak predicted for the solar neighborhood initial cluster mass function.
Publication date
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationNational Research Council Canada; NRC Herzberg Institute of Astrophysics
Peer reviewedYes
NPARC number19739565
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Record identifier24bac35c-9cc5-44f7-880f-bb8aa16c91b8
Record created2012-03-29
Record modified2016-05-09
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