Identification and characterisation of a novel antimicrobial polypeptide from the skin secretion of a Chinese frog (Rana chensinensis)

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DOIResolve DOI: http://doi.org/10.1016/j.ijantimicag.2008.11.010
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TypeArticle
Journal titleInternational Journal of Antimicrobial Agents
Volume33
Issue6
Pages538542; # of pages: 5
SubjectRana chensinensis; Frog skin secretion; Antimicrobial peptides; Haemolytic activity
AbstractAmphibians secrete small antimicrobial polypeptides from their skin that have been explored as alternatives to conventional antibiotics. In this study, mass spectrometry was used to identify and characterise protein secretions from the skin of a Chinese frog, Rana chensinensis. The skin of this kind of frog has been used in traditional Chinese medicine for centuries as a remedy against inflammation. A novel antimicrobial peptide was identified and the characteristics of this peptide were analysed using far-ultraviolet circular dichroism. When dissolved in aqueous solution, the peptide displayed a high level of random coil structure, in contrast to a more ordered α-helical structure when dissolved in 50% trifluoroethanol. Functional studies showed that this peptide has potent antimicrobial activity both against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria and has extremely low haemolytic activity to human red blood cells. Taken together, these studies suggest that this novel peptide can be further developed as an antimicrobial agent.
Publication date
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationNational Research Council Canada (NRC-CNRC); NRC Institute for Biological Sciences
Peer reviewedYes
NPARC number15329299
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Record identifier2509d5b3-ad9d-4fa5-9f26-db9aebdba698
Record created2010-05-21
Record modified2016-05-09
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