On the estimation of time dependent lift of a European starling (Sturnus vulgaris) during flapping flight

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DOIResolve DOI: http://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0134582
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TypeArticle
Journal titlePLoS ONE
ISSN1932-6203
Article numbere0134582
Pages# of pages: 20
AbstractWe study the role of unsteady lift in the context of flapping wing bird flight. Both aerodynamicists and biologists have attempted to address this subject, yet it seems that the contribution of unsteady lift still holds many open questions. The current study deals with the estimation of unsteady aerodynamic forces on a freely flying bird through analysis of wingbeat kinematics and near wake flow measurements using time resolved particle image velocimetry. The aerodynamic forces are obtained through two approaches, the unsteady thin airfoil theory and using the momentum equation for viscous flows. The unsteady lift is comprised of circulatory and non-circulatory components. Both approaches are presented over the duration of wingbeat cycles. Using long-time sampling data, several wingbeat cycles have been analyzed in order to cover both the downstroke and upstroke phases. It appears that the unsteady lift varies over the wingbeat cycle emphasizing its contribution to the total lift and its role in power estimations. It is suggested that the circulatory lift component cannot assumed to be negligible and should be considered when estimating lift or power of birds in flapping motion.
Publication date
PublisherPublic Library of Science
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationAerospace; National Research Council Canada
Peer reviewedYes
NPARC number23001925
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Record identifier25738c19-3837-4a37-8330-398568a20dba
Record created2017-06-01
Record modified2017-06-01
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