Determination of the pedestrian wind environment in the city of Ottawa using wind tunnel and field measurements

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DOIResolve DOI: http://doi.org/10.1016/0167-6105(92)90418-A
AuthorSearch for: ; Search for:
TypeArticle
Journal titleJournal of Wind Engineering and Industrial Aerodynamics
Volume41
Issue1-3
Pages255266; # of pages: 12
AbstractThe objective of this study was to determine the pedestrian-level wind conditions throughout the central area of the City of Ottawa, Canada. A 1:400 scale model, 7.3m in diameter, of the central area was tested in the NRCC 9×9m wind tunnel. Windspeeds were measured simultaneously at 615 pedestrian-level locations, and above three selected model buildings, for 16 directions of the approaching winds. Fullscale wind measurements were made for 7000 hours at the city airport and simultaneously above the same three buildings over a period of 15 months and for 217 hours with a mobile anemometer unit that measured the windspeed at a height of 2m. Special techniques used radio and telephone links to transmit wind data from both fixed and mobile remote sites. The objective was achieved by combining the modelscale and fullscale wind measurements with the long-term wind statistics from the airport. From these measurements we can now predict the mean and gust windspeeds which will occur with weekly, monthly, seasonal and per annum probabilities at each of the 615 locations, for each of the 16 wind directions.
Publication date
AffiliationNRC Institute for Ocean Technology; National Research Council Canada
Peer reviewedYes
IdentifierIR-1991-12
NRC number5244
NPARC number8895589
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Record identifier266e9dc3-6248-46a7-a29c-e19f770d9218
Record created2009-04-22
Record modified2016-05-09
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