Characterization of detector modulation-transfer function with noise, edge, and holographic methods

Download
  1. Get@NRC: Characterization of detector modulation-transfer function with noise, edge, and holographic methods (Opens in a new window)
DOIResolve DOI: http://doi.org/10.1016/j.ultramic.2013.02.021
AuthorSearch for: ; Search for:
TypeArticle
Journal titleUltramicroscopy
ISSN0304-3991
Volume129
Pages4252; # of pages: 11
SubjectSlow-scan CCD detector; CCD camera; Electron detection; Scintillator; Modulation transfer function (MTF); Point spread function (PSF); Noise transfer function (NTF); Noise power spectrum (NPS); Incomplete read-out; Detector quantum efficiency (DQE); Detector noise; Electron holography; Transmission electron microscopy (TEM); Gain reference; Reference images
AbstractWe developed a new method for characterization of detector performance used in the transmission electron microscope (TEM) based on the measured contrast of holographic fringes. The new method changes spatial frequency of the measured holographic fringes, generated by an electrostatic biprism and Schottky or cold field-emission gun, to sample the modulation-transfer function (MTF) of the detector. The MTF of a Gatan Ultrascan™ 1000 charged-coupled detector (CCD) is evaluated using the new method and the results are compared to the established noise and slanted-edge method results. Requirements for accuracy of the edge and noise MTF methods are discussed. We consider issues surrounding incomplete read-out and how it affects the gain reference normalization of the detector. We evaluate how the MTF affects optimization of experimental parameters in the TEM. © 2013 Elsevier B.V.
Publication date
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationNational Research Council Canada (NRC-CNRC); Security and Disruptive Technologies
Peer reviewedYes
NPARC number21271873
Export citationExport as RIS
Report a correctionReport a correction
Record identifier26dfbc02-49e2-471e-ae97-fdaeb51c9882
Record created2014-04-24
Record modified2016-05-09
Bookmark and share
  • Share this page with Facebook (Opens in a new window)
  • Share this page with Twitter (Opens in a new window)
  • Share this page with Google+ (Opens in a new window)
  • Share this page with Delicious (Opens in a new window)