Tracking sentiment in mail : How genders differ on emotional axes

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TypeArticle
Proceedings titleProceedings of the 2nd Workshop on Computational Approaches to Subjectivity and Sentiment Analysis (ACL-HLT 2011
Conference49th Annual Meeting of the Association for Computational Linguistics: Human Language Technologies Workshop on Computational Approaches to Subjectivity and Sentiment Analysis (WASSA), June 19-24, 2011, Portland, Oregon, USA
Pages7079; # of pages: 10
AbstractWith the widespread usage of email, we now have access to unprecedented amounts of text that we ourselves have written. In this paper, we show how sentiment analysis can be used in tandem with effective visualizations to quantify and track emotions in many types of mail. We create a large word–emotion association lexicon by crowdsourcing, and use it to compare emotions in love letters, hate mail, and suicide notes. We show that there are marked differences across genders in how they use emotion words in work-place email. For example, women use many words from the joy–sadness axis, whereas men prefer terms from the fear–trust axis. Finally, we show visualizations that can help people track emotions in their emails.
Publication date
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationNRC Institute for Information Technology; National Research Council Canada
Peer reviewedNo
NPARC number18456273
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Record identifier2739d3c6-dc2d-479c-8e3a-65f42e7b7e3f
Record created2011-08-18
Record modified2016-05-09
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