A study of wake discretization in relation to the performance of a propeller panel method

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TypeArticle
Journal titleOceanic Engineering International
Volume6
Issue1
Pages3239; # of pages: 8
Subjectdiscretization; velocity; torque coefficients; downstream
AbstractA wake model is formulated for a time domain propeller panel method covering near field to far field wake regions as a means of improving downstream field velocity predictions. Comparison with previous experimental results is performed for shaft thrust and torque coefficients and downstream induced velocities. Results show that the shape of wake vortices due to influences of induced velocity components has a strong influence on the downstream flow field velocity prediction because of the orientation of the doublets of the wake panels. Inclusion of induced tangential and radial velocities for the wake deformation has also a strong influence on the resolution of the predicted downstream velocities near the blade tip and root torque coefficients. A wake contraction via a transition-ultimate wake scheme from a previous study is implemented and tested. Compared with the effect of wake pitch stretch and decay rate due to relaxation, the transition-ultimate wake scheme had a significant effect on load predictions of the induced velocities in the near field region. An experimental survey of the fare wake region, and numerical validation of it, are proposed for the near future.
Publication date
AffiliationNRC Institute for Ocean Technology; National Research Council Canada
Peer reviewedYes
IdentifierIR-2002-17
NRC number5746
NPARC number8895242
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Record identifier28f318ac-6151-4ac6-982b-dd9d92f72dd7
Record created2009-04-22
Record modified2016-05-09
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