Effects of low temperature preannealing on ion-implant assisted intermixing of Si1−xGex/Si quantum wells

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DOIResolve DOI: http://doi.org/10.1063/1.117131
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TypeArticle
Journal titleApplied Physics Letters
Volume69
Issue25
Pages38663868; # of pages: 3
SubjectQuantum Wells; Silicon; Germanium Silicides; Ion Implantation; Annealing; Photoluminescence; Energy Gap; Cvd; Ge And Si; Kinetics Of Defect Formation And Annealing; Low-Dimensional; Mesoscopic; Nanoscale And Other Related Systems: Structure And Nonelectronic Properties; Elemental Semiconductors
AbstractUsing photoluminescence we have studied the effect of a low temperature ‘‘preanneal’’ stage on the intermixing of 3 nm Si0.7Ge0.3/Si quantum wells, implanted with silicon ions having energies up to 1 MeV and then exposed to rapid thermal annealing at 850 °C for 300 s. We find that an unwanted quantum well band gap increase in unimplanted samples after rapid thermal annealing can be reduced substantially from ∼30 to ∼5 meV due to the removal of grown‐in defects by preannealing at 630 °C for 24 h. Preannealed samples that were implanted and rapid thermal annealed showed at least the same band gap increase (up to 70 meV in these samples) observed for nonpreannealed samples. These results are understood in terms of significantly different activation energies for defect diffusion and quantum well intermixing and a nonlinear dependence of the energy shifts on defect concentrations.
Publication date
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationNational Research Council Canada; NRC Institute for Microstructural Sciences
Peer reviewedYes
NPARC number12338563
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Record identifier2906fa51-c9f3-4f81-80b4-630f4be809d9
Record created2009-09-10
Record modified2016-05-09
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