Using multimodal femtosecond CARS imaging to determine plaque burden in luminal atherosclerosis

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Proceedings titleProceedings of SPIE
ConferenceMultiphoton Microscopy in the Biomedical Sciences XI, 23 January 2011, San Francisco, California, USA
Subjectmultimodal; femtosecond CARS; atherosclerosis; luminal imaging; plaque burden; texture analysis; first-order statistics; myocardial infarction-prone rabbit
AbstractLuminal atherosclerosis imaging was demonstrated by multimodal femtosecond CARS microscopy (MM-CARS). Using a myocardial infarction-prone rabbit model of atherosclerosis, this study demonstrated the utility of multimodal CARS imaging in determining atherosclerotic plaque burden through two types of image analysis procedures. Firstly, multimodal CARS images were evaluated using a signal-intensity parameter based on intensity changes derived from the multi-channel data (e.g. TPEF, SHG and CARS) to classify plaque burden within the vessel. Secondly, the SHG images that mainly correspond to collagen fibrils were evaluated using a texture analysis model based on the first-order statistical (FOS) parameters of the image histogram. Correlation between FOS parameters of collagen images with atherosclerosis plaque burden was established. A preliminary study of using spectroscopic CARS in identifying the different lipid components within the plaque was also discussed.
Publication date
AffiliationNRC Institute for Biodiagnostics; NRC Steacie Institute for Molecular Sciences; National Research Council Canada
Peer reviewedYes
NPARC number19697994
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Record identifier294513cf-75a8-4b28-81a3-2ef35e7e2539
Record created2012-03-22
Record modified2016-05-09
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