Novel RBPJ transcripts identified in human amniotic fluid cells

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DOIResolve DOI: http://doi.org/10.1007/s12015-010-9162-1
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TypeArticle
Journal titleStem Cell Reviews and Reports
Volume6
Issue4
Pages677684; # of pages: 8
SubjectAlternative splicing; Notch; NT2; Neurons; RNA isoforms
AbstractThe NOTCH signaling pathway plays important roles in stem cell maintenance, cell-fate determination and differentiation during development. Following ligand binding, the cleaved NOTCH intracellular domain (NICD) interacts directly with the recombinant signal binding protein for immunoglobulin kappa J region (RBPJ) transcription factor and the resulting complex targets gene expression in the nucleus. To date, four human RBPJ isoforms have been described in Entrez Gene, varying in the first 5′coding exons. Using an improved protocol, we were able to further identify all four known and five novel RBPJ transcript variants in human amniotic fluid (AF) cells, a cell type known for its stem cell characteristics. In addition, we used human embryonal carcinoma (EC) NTera2/D1 (NT2) cells and NT2-derived neuron and astrocytes to compare the expression pattern of RBPJ transcripts. Further examination of RBPJ transcripts showed that the novel splice variants contain open reading frames in-frame with the known isoforms, suggesting that they can putatively generate similar function proteins. All known and novel RBPJ transcripts contain the putative nuclear localization signal (NLS), an important component of RBPJ-mediated gene regulation.
Publication date
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationNRC Institute for Biological Sciences; National Research Council Canada
Peer reviewedYes
NPARC number17653010
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Record identifier29546725-185c-4f16-932b-3f5c3aa32906
Record created2011-04-01
Record modified2016-05-09
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