Supplemental diagnosis and molecular taxonomy of Myxobolus diaphanus (myxozoa) parasitizing Fundulus diaphorus (Cyprinalontidal) in Nova Scotia, Canada

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DOIResolve DOI: http://doi.org/10.14411/fp.2005.029
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TypeArticle
Journal titleFolia Parasitologica
Volume52
Issue3
Pages217222; # of pages: 6
SubjectMyxozoa; Myxobolus diaphanus; supplemental diagnosis; Fundulus diaphanus; Nova Scotia
AbstractMyxobolus diaphanus (Fantham, Porter et Richardson, 1940) was found in banded killifish Fundulus diaphanus (Lesueur) at several freshwater localities in Nova Scotia, including the type locality at the mouth of the Salmon River, Guysborough County. The new material, the first to be reported in 64 years, was used to supplement information on spore morphology, to document the site of development in the tissue, and to compare sequence data of the 18S rDNA to other studied myxobolids. Plasmodia with developed spores occurred in loose connective tissue of the head, the dermis (particularly in the roof of the mouth and at the base of fins), surface of the brain and ovary, muscle epimysium, and the submucosa of the intestine. Developed plasmodia containing spores were also found free in the lumen of the vena cava and within fluid-filled spaces of the skull, mandible and lower jaw. A phylogenetic analysis using 18S rDNA (878 bp) placed M. diaphanus in a terminal clade containing certain freshwater species of Henneguya, all of which occur in North America and have elongate spore bodies.
Publication date
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationNRC Institute for Marine Biosciences; National Research Council Canada
Peer reviewedYes
NRC number42474
1393
NPARC number3538342
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Record identifier2973ab7c-ef41-41bb-82db-76c42bf31954
Record created2009-03-01
Record modified2016-05-09
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