Technical innovations that may facilitate real-time telementoring of damage control surgery in austere environments : a proof of concept comparative evaluation of the importance of surgical experience, telepresence, gravity and mentoring in the conduct of damage control laparotomies

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DOIResolve DOI: http://doi.org/10.1503/cjs.014214
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TypeArticle
Journal titleCanadian Journal of Surgery
ISSN0008-428X
Volume58
Issue3 Suppl. 3
PagesS88S90
AbstractBleeding to death is the most preventable cause of posttraumatic death worldwide. Despite the fact that many of these deaths are anatomically salvageable with relatively basic surgical interventions, they remain lethal in actuality in prehospital environments when no facilities and skills exist to contemplate undertaking basic damage control surgery (DCS). With better attention to prehospital control of extremity hemorrhage, intracavitary bleeding (especially intraperitoneal) remains beyond the scope of prehospital providers. However, recent revolutions in the informatics and techniques of telementoring (TMT), DCS and highly realistic accelerated training of motivated first responders suggests that basic lifesaving DCS may have applicability to save bleeding patients in austere environments previously considered unsalvageable. Especially with informatic advances, any provider with Internet connectivity can potentially be supported by highly proficient specialists with content expertise in the index problem. This unprecedented TMT support may allow highly motivated but inexperienced personnel to provide advanced surgical interventions in extreme environments in many austere locations both on and above the planet.
Publication date
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationAerospace; National Research Council Canada
Peer reviewedYes
NPARC number23001125
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Record identifier2a5a679c-ee8d-4530-9910-3c663ba4d8fb
Record created2016-12-14
Record modified2016-12-14
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