Morphing wing real time optimization in wind tunnel tests

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TypeArticle
Proceedings titleProceedings of the 7th International Conference on Informatics in Control, Automation and Robotics, Funchal, Madeira, Portugal, June 15-18, 2010
ConferenceICINCO 2010, the 7th International Conference on Informatics in Control, Automation and Robotics, June 15-18, 2010, Funchal, Madeira, Portugal
Volume1
IssueInteligent control systems and optimization
AbstractIn this paper, wind tunnel results of a real time optimization of a morphing wing in wind tunnel for delaying the transition towards the trailing edge are presented. A morphing rectangular finite aspect ratio wing, having a wind tunnel experimental airfoil reference cross-section, was considered with its upper surface made of a flexible composite material and instrumented with Kulite pressure sensors, and two smart memory alloys actuators. Several wind tunnel tests runs for various Mach numbers, angles of attack and Reynolds numbers were performed in the 6'x9' wind tunnel at the Institute for Aerospace Research at the National Research Council Canada. Unsteady pressure signals were recorded and used as feed back in real time control while the morphing wing was requested to reproduce various optimized airfoils by changing automatically the two actuators strokes. The paper shows the optimization method implemented into the control software code that allows the morphing wing to adjust its shape to an optimum configuration under the wind tunnel airflow conditions.
Publication date
PublisherSciTePress, Science and Technology Publications
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationNational Research Council Canada; NRC Institute for Aerospace Research
Peer reviewedYes
Identifier9789898425003
NPARC number23001288
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Record identifier2ab3650a-db0c-4996-88e8-9ef8052aa3f5
Record created2017-01-13
Record modified2017-01-13
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